“In the run-up to RetroArch 1.1 – what’s new pt. 5

We’ve been away for half a year so there is a lot to talk about in this new upcoming release. Rest assured I’m working hard as hell to meet the Christmas sweet spot.  It will take a couple of blog posts to go through it all. So let’s start with the first one. I’m putting these articles out now because I really don’t fancy having to write all this stuff later on in the holidays when I drop this stuff.

In this blog post, let’s talk some more about new cores

Continue reading ““In the run-up to RetroArch 1.1 – what’s new pt. 5”

In the run-up to RetroArch 1.1 – what’s ‘new’ pt. 3

We’ve been away for half a year so there is a lot to talk about in this new upcoming release. Rest assured I’m working hard as hell to meet the Christmas sweet spot.  It will take a couple of blog posts to go through it all. So let’s start with the first one. I’m putting these articles out now because I really don’t fancy having to write all this stuff later on in the holidays when I drop this stuff.

In this blog post, let’s talk about some more about new cores and some fixes to existing cores

Continue reading “In the run-up to RetroArch 1.1 – what’s ‘new’ pt. 3”

In the run-up to RetroArch 1.1 – what’s ‘new’ pt. 1

We’ve been away for half a year so there is a lot to talk about in this new upcoming release. Rest assured I’m working hard as hell to meet the Christmas sweet spot.  It will take a couple of blog posts to go through it all. So let’s start with the first one. I’m putting these articles out now because I really don’t fancy having to write all this stuff later on in the holidays when I drop this stuff.

In this blog post, let’s talk about one of the big new cores you can expect – gpSP.

gpSP

There has been some complaints in the past that the Game Boy Advance libretro cores are a bit too slow on some older systems. So people with lower-performance devices should probably be glad by the arrival of this core.

This is a Game Boy Advance emulator written by Exophase originally for the PSP.  It was a fast and reasonably compatible GBA emulator that later on made an appearance on platforms like iOS and Android by unofficial porters.

Exophase stopped working on this emulator around 2009 and ever since then the codebase has been gradually decaying. The interpreter CPU core was broken on 64-bit CPUs, the x86 dynarec was 32-bit only, and there is just no central repository that aimed at making this a reasonable first-class citizen that could compete against things like VBA-M and bgba.

So the libretro core is an attempt to do all that. It uses as a base notaz’ gpsp repo but strips out the Pandora/Raspberry Pi/GP2x-specific code and aims for a more general-purpose codebase. We managed to get the ARM dynarec working on Android with some code edits, and we also fixed a few bugs that was preventing the interpreter core from working on Intel 64bit architecture.

Performance-wise, the main substantial difference is when the dynarec is enabled obviously. This core should be substantially faster right now on ARM 32bit systems (Android/iOS/Blackberry, etc) than VBA-M and the VBA-Next cores ever did. It should be fast enough on Raspberry Pi and low-end Android devices like the Xperia Play. The 32-bit x86 dynarec should also be very beneficial for users that don’t mind putting up with 32bit code. Getting a 64-bit dynarec up and running is something that is on the installment plan (for me anyway).

Savestates should work but don’t expect to be able to use savestates from other gpSP-based emulators like Gameboid or whatever.  We had to change the savestate format/size during our 64bit compatibility patches, so this is unavoidable. Though really you shouldn’t expect savestates made with non-libretro based cores to be compatible with libretro cores necessarily anyway, so let’s not pretend like this is an issue.

As for how the performance is like with the interpreter? It varies from game to game. Games like Tekken Advance and Super Mario Advance are actually slower with the interpreter core than the same games on VBA Next, but then you have the odd exceptions like Metroid, Zelda, Wario Land, Donkey Kong Country games and Astro Boy where the performance with interpreter gpSP is at least twice as fast as VBA Next. Hopefully in the long run we can fix these remaining bottlenecks with interpreter core so that there is a nice counterweight to VBA-based emulators that is at least substantially faster even with just the interpreter core.

So what’s done?

– Runs on Android with the dynarec.

– Runs on 32-bit Intel with the dynarec.

– 64bit compatibility patches so that interpreter core runs on 64bit CPUs.

– Savestates work, SRAM works, most general features you’d expect from libretro, etc.

What still needs to be done in the future?

– Get the ARM dynarec working on iOS which requires some more patches. For now, the iOS port is using the interpreter so performance is not yet as great as it should be.

– Find some way to drop support in for Normatt’s open-source BIOS replacement so that users don’t necessarily have to use the ‘official’ GBA BIOS.

– Make the performance with the interpreter core a lot more even across games. Some games getting easily twice the performance as VBA Next while some games are actually 100fps lower than VBA Next seems to indicate that there is room for improvement here.

– Do the same as what I did with VBA Next/VBA-M cores and just ‘bake in’ the needed ‘assets’ that this emulator needs. Right now it needs a file called ‘game_config.txt’ present in the system directory which enables some idle loop optimization speedhacks among other things. This should all just be baked into the core later on.

– Make it big-endian compatible so it can run on consoles and PowerPC-based Macs.

– (If I have time to waste) write a PPC dynarec so we can really have a fast GBA core on PowerPC-based targets.